Author Topic: Regarding job title.  (Read 1407 times)

Offline jaymin54

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Regarding job title.
« on: Dec 10, 2015, 08:14 »




I want to know about different job position after completing 2 year power engineering program and after getting 4th & 3rd class certification. Which type of position is offer after geeting 4th or 3rd class certification? As operator or Shift engineer? what is difference between them ? if one can get 2nd class or 1st class certification? which position industry offers for that? what is the promotion scheme in power industry? so if anyone can explain me in depth , it will be appreciated.
Thank you



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Offline Jason R

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Re: Regarding job title.
« Reply #1 on: Dec 11, 2015, 10:30 »
I'll provide a well-written explanation soon.
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Offline jaymin54

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Re: Regarding job title.
« Reply #2 on: Dec 11, 2015, 21:46 »
Thank you for your concern. waiting for your reply.
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Offline Jason R

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Re: Regarding job title.
« Reply #3 on: Dec 21, 2015, 09:40 »
The Rank and File of Power Engineers in Canada

How the different classes of power engineers stack up in the workplace is a question that comes up routinely in the power engineering community. I hope to go into detail with this post in an effort to not just answer the original post in this thread but to make it a reference for future readers.

This post will discuss plant classifications and certificates and the differences between a chief, shift, assistant shift engineer and assistant engineer.

Every province has different regulations which are in many ways the same but can be different. This post will go by the British Columbian regulations and definitions.  So, let's get to it.

Plant Classifications and Certificates

Plants are classified by the discretion of the safety authority based on factors such as proximity to the public, the required staffing deemed appropriate by the chief inspector, the type of (safety) technology used at the plant, and the heating surface of the plant. In British Columbia, there are five classifications of plants which range from fifth to first.

As mentioned, one of the major factors used in classifying a plant is heating surface, or plant capacity. Depending on the province, this is determined in calculating the plant's heating surface or kilo-Watt output. The output requirements are different if the plant uses high-pressure steam, low-pressure steam, or hot water boilers.

Here are the requirements for a fourth-class in British Columbia as an example (with my notes and comments in blue):

"fourth class plant" means
(a) a power plant (a steam plant producing steam over 15 psig) that exceeds 50 m2 of boiler capacity but does not exceed 100 m2 of boiler capacity,
(b) a heating plant (hot water boilers) that exceeds 300 m2 of boiler capacity,
(c) a low pressure thermal fluid plant (heating a fluid that does not expand and is not heated above the atmospheric vapour temperature) that exceeds 500 m2 of boiler capacity but does not exceed 1 500 m2 of boiler capacity,
(d) a low temperature low pressure fluid (liquid below 100 Celsius and 206 kPa) plant that exceeds 1 000 m2 of boiler capacity, or
(e) an unfired (no combustion; like a building that is supplied with steam from another plant and uses heat exchanges to heat water) plant that exceeds 500 m2 of boiler capacity but does not exceed 1 000 m2 of boiler capacity;

It is important to familiar with the rules, regulations and definitions of the jurisdiction that you work in.

A person's power engineering certificate will determine the role they play in the plant.

Every plant requires a chief engineer to take overall responsibility and accountability for the equipment in the plant. The chief's certificate must be equal to the certification of the plant. For example, a fourth-class plant must have a fourth-class power engineer as the chief. If there are , or more, fourth-class power engineers working in the plant, the owner of the plant must designate one of these engineers as the chief engineer (or, depending on workplace policy, the chief position may go to the power engineer with most seniority at the plant and who holds the proper certificate).
This brings us to the second part of this post:

Roles and Responsibilities of Power Engineers, based on Plant Classification

Rather than typing a wall of text, I've created a table which uses the official job titles listed in the British Columbian regulations. These job titles may be different at each specific plant (i.e. Assistant engineer may be called an operating engineer).

Positions and The Required Certificate, Based on Plant Classification

Title/Plant Size

Fifth-Class

Fourth-Class

Third-class

Second-Class

First-Class

Chief Engineer

Fifth-Class

Fourth-Class

Third-Class

Second-Class

First-Class

Shift Engineer

Fifth-Class

Fifth-Class

Fourth-Class

Third-Class

Second-Class

Assistant Shift Engineer

None

Fifth-Class

Fifth-Class

Fourth-Class

Third-Class

Assistant Engineer

None

None

Fifth-Class

Fifth-Class

Fourth-Class


It must be noted that not all these positions will exist at every plant. For example, a first-class plant may get by with only chief engineer, shift engineer, and assistant shift engineer positions; a third-class plant may only have chief engineer and shift engineer positions. Again, the job titles may differ from plant to plant; this table lists the official titles as per the British Columbian regulations.

Some plants will start a new power engineer from the bottom position and get them to graduate through the plant positions. To graduate upwards in a plant, you may be required to work a certain position for a certain time and write in-house exams.

A second-class power engineer in a first-class plant may find themselves working the entry level position for some time. This is done to ensure the power engineer learns every part of the plant before taking a position that requires them to supervise other power engineers. A supervisor who knows each position in the plant inside-and-out is better than a supervisor who does not have first-hand experience with the positions they are supposed to supervise.

Every industry and company is unique in their requirement but they may follow the above basic structure. If you want to work for a specific company, you should put in an effort to learn their hierarchy and schedule your studies and book your exams accordingly.





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Offline jaymin54

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Re: Regarding job title.
« Reply #4 on: Dec 22, 2015, 02:11 »
Thank you Sir for your well written note. now i got it about different post at different plants.
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