Author Topic: Self regulation  (Read 774 times)

Offline biggeer

  • Regular Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: 0
Self regulation
« on: Jun 24, 2016, 09:23 »
Hi everybody. I just wanted to gather some thoughts on something I've been thinking about for many years. What do think about pursuing making Power Engineering a new Self-Regulating Profession? I would appreciate your feedback very much. I've floated this idea out there to colleagues with mixed results, but I think it's something that might save our future and worth investigating.
  • Certification: Third Class

Offline Jason R

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 129
  • Karma: 0
    • Professional Portfolio
Re: Self regulation
« Reply #1 on: Jun 25, 2016, 12:49 »
Hey biggeer,

Welcome to the boards.

I'm interested in learning more about your definition of a self-regulating profession.

Looking forward to your response.
  • Certification: Second-Class, 1A1
Forum Administrator
Q: "What's it like being a forum admin?"
A: "I spend more time struggling with a system, that has had no major updates since 2004, than I do posting."

Offline biggeer

  • Regular Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: 0
Re: Self regulation
« Reply #2 on: Jul 05, 2016, 14:00 »
Hello and thanks for welcoming me aboard. Sorry for the delayed response.

By "self-regulation", essentially I mean similar to other professions such as medicine, law, engineering, dentistry, etc. Such occupations operate within their own scope of practice, which include codes of conduct, minimum specified educational requirements, disciplinary measures, and so on. In return, the government (meaning usually provincial) grants a self-regulating profession a high, but limited, degree of autonomy from direct governmental oversight with the trust that it will act consistently in the best interests of the public.

Ok, that's a bit to chew on, but in general terms that's a simplified definition. So why would Power Engineers care about this? I'm actually not advocating one way or another. While there are some advantages very long term (say, in making the profession more responsive to actual labour market demand), the bureaucratic process would be arduous and probably highly political. It would involve teasing out decades of carefully crafted pressure vessel and power engineering certification legislation to redefine a new legal entity at huge cost and administrative overhead to power engineers to essentially duplicate what already exists. And why fix something that's not broken? Or is it...?
  • Certification: Third Class